Today I filed with the U.S. Supreme Court a petition for certiorari — a request that the review the decision of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals who declared that the TSA can lawfully search for anything they think is suspicious, including by reading your documents. The ruling from the 11th Circuit, which covers Florida, Georgia, and Alabama, is in direct contrast to the 9th Circuit, which covers most of the Pacific time zone, who ruled repeatedly, and as recently as 2007, that TSA searches must be “no more extensive nor intensive than necessary, in the light of current technology, to detect the presence of weapons or explosives [and] confined in good faith to that purpose.”

Although I believe the above to be the most important issue I’ve raised, the petition also asks the court to take a look at numerous other questions, including whether TSA screeners are liable for assault and false arrest committed while on duty, whether they should reconsider their narrow interpretation that gutted the Privacy Act in 2012, and more.

The Supreme Court accepts an extraordinarily small portion of the cases presented to them. I hope they find review of a search that affects 2 million Americans daily to be worthy of their attention.

Corbett v. TSA – Petition for Certiorari (.pdf)