Last but not least: in order to get change to happen in the government, assuming you don’t have enough money to buy whatever change you want, you need to get society riled up. Snowden did a great job at this, because he illustrated for the country what was being done, and had the credibility to do so, rather than just saying, “yeah, the government is doing all this bad stuff” like many of us have assumed for years.

But, the spread of an idea happens not because the media talks about it, but because families talk about it at the dinner table, co-workers at the water cooler, Redditors bitch and moan on the Internet, etc. No matter how big your “megaphone” is, it is not bigger than the millions of small voices working together. Discussing your concerns and sharing with those who, perhaps, don’t understand why this is a problem, why this is a problem, is so important.

If you’d like to share things they can do to protect their privacy, here’s an index of this series (share this post to share the index, or pick a post and share the direct link):

It’s been an exciting month. I started this series before the Snowden leak, and it just so happened to have perfect timing. I hope it’s raised a little bit of awareness of how we’re all tracked and what we can do to stop it.


This is one of a 30-part series, “No Surveillance State Month,” where daily for the month of June I’ll be posting ways to avoid invasion of your privacy in the digital age. The intent of these posts is not to enable one to escape detection while engaging in criminal activity — there’s still the old-fashioned “send a detective to watch you” for which these posts will not help. Rather, this series will help you to opt-out of the en masse collection of data by the government and large corporations that places Americans in databases without their knowing and freely-given consent for indefinite time periods. We all have the right to privacy, and I hope you demand it.